Go back
Windows, Doors & Conservatories

Painting Plastered Walls In Conservatory: Your Go-To Guide

painting-plastered-walls-in-conservatory.jpg

A freshly plastered and painted conservatory can look fantastic and is fairly easy to do, but there’s a right way and a wrong way to approach the makeover project.

If you’re not careful when painting plastered walls in a conservatory then you can end up with a terrible finish, or serious damp problems, which will not only mean that all your hard work was for nothing but also means that there’s a lot more work to do.

To help you to get the project right, the first time around, here’s everything that you need to know about painting over plaster in a conservatory…

Choosing the Right Paint for Plastered Conservatory Walls

Painting over plaster may just seem like any old painting job, but there are some very different requirements to painting plaster than there is a normal wall. For the perfect finish, it’s essential that you do your research before beginning.

The first obstacle that you’ll come across is deciding which paint to use. For a plastered wall, emulsion paint is normally the best option, but to achieve a clean finish that looks great, it’s important to choose a high-quality paint. 

Then you need to choose the exact kind of finish that you want. There is a lot of variation between paint types, but for a great result in a conservatory, sticking to either matt or satin is a good call.

Once you have your paint ready, the wall still needs a little preparation before you begin…

painting-plastered-walls-in-conservatory1.jpg

A plastered wall requires a mist coat before you start painting with standard paint, this will seal the wall and even show you where there are any uneven areas in the plaster. A mist coat is essentially just watered-down emulsion, around 70% paint to 30% water

Mist Coats for Plastered Walls

The biggest thing to remember when painting plaster is that you should never paint damp plaster. This is a recipe for disaster, as you’ll essentially be adding a layer that stops the damp in the walls from escaping. 

Before you paint, you need to make sure that the wall is 100% dry. Then it’s time to deal with the next problem that plaster is prone to – absorbing water.

Plaster is going to absorb any liquid that you put on it, which includes the water in your paint. If you apply paint straight to the walls, then it’ll dry far too quickly and completely ruin the finish. 

A plastered wall requires a mist coat before you start painting with standard paint, this will seal the wall and even show you where there are any uneven areas in the plaster. A mist coat is essentially just watered-down emulsion, around 70% paint to 30% water.

Once your walls are mist-coated and you’ve filled in any flaws, you’re ready to paint!

The Top Solutions to Fix Conservatory Damp Problems

Damp in a conservatory is not just limited to problems surrounding sealing wet plaster. Damp can originate from other sources and you may even find that your plaster doesn’t dry at all if you already have damp walls. 

Problems with damp can affect your entire conservatory environment and possibly even destroy any paint that you use on the walls. Leaving damp untreated can lead to dangerous mould growth, structural damage and expensive repairs.

Thankfully, there are multiple ways that you can prevent damp in a conservatory, including the application of a wall coating and the installation of conservatory roof insulation:

painting-plastered-walls-in-a-conservatory1.jpg

Big makeover projects like painting over plaster can be much more effective when you make sure that your conservatory is warm, comfortable and not prone to damp problems

Option 1: Wall Coatings

If your conservatory has been constructed with dwarf walls, then a hydrophobic wall coating can help to protect the masonry from water absorption. A good wall coating will stop water absorption by 95% and reduce the thermal conductivity of your walls for a warmer conservatory environment. 

Option 2: Conservatory Insulation 

Multi-foil insulation that has been installed under the roof of the conservatory will help to prevent condensation from forming, which occurs when warm air interacts with a cold surface. 

The vapour control in the insulation will defend against condensation, damp and mould and the insulation will help to regulate the temperature in your conservatory for a comfortable environment all year round – a warm home is also less likely to become damp!

Option 3: Other Ways to Eliminate Damp

You can also help to reduce the risk of damp in a conservatory by lowering your water output, ensuring that there’s plenty of ventilation in the conservatory to allow air to circulate and staying on top of general maintenance, like cleaning out gutters. 

Protect Your Conservatory with Home Logic

Big makeover projects like painting over plaster can be much more effective when you make sure that your conservatory is warm, comfortable and not prone to damp problems.

For more advice about the best ways to eliminate damp from your conservatory with wall coatings or insulation, give Home Logic a call today on 0800 1700 636, or click the button below to get started today!